My Manifesto for the UK Post Brexit (Part 3 – Defence and International Development)

Defence and International Development
Based on the facts that i) many of our military interventions have not proved to have the outcome we had hoped for, ii) the nature of the risks we face has changed, iii) we must build positively for peace, there will need to be an overhaul of our previous approach to defence.
I would seek to re-orientate the armed forces to be a peace building force, using the excellent history of discipline and service. This would be combined with an international development policy, building effective partnerships with developing nations to serve other nations in establishing infrastructure, transport routes, energy systems, sanitation systems, health hubs and schools. I would support a more collaborative approach with 3rd sector international development cooperatives to help support initiatives led by local communities. It is far better to collaborate and build than to tear down and destroy. These teams would actively work with progressive governments, seeking to promote the rights of oppressed people and communities, providing protection where necessary to allow people to flourish.
The UK needs to lead the world in nuclear disarmament, rather than renew trident and use the incredible engineering skills of companies currently involved in the manufacturing of weapons to turn their attention to other forms of engineering, like the creation of renewable energies for a greener and more sustainable future.

My Manifesto for the UK Post Brexit (Part 2 – Politics and Economics)

Here are some thoughts on Political Structures and the Economy:

 

Political Organisation

I would want to legislate Proportional Representation for a fairer reflection of the political will of the people, with coalitions becoming the norm, leading to a more collaborative and conciliatory form of politics, involving real engagement with and empowerment of local people in their communities.

Political conversations in local communities will mean that politicians and public servants do not come up with good ideas and “do things to people”, but rather learn to form environments of participatory leadership where co-commissioning becomes the norm. “No decision about me, without me, is for me.” (Leeds Poverty Truth Challenge). This is part of the new politics we need.

Sovereignty can be understood in several ways. From my perspective there are two competing narratives that frame the debate. Sovereignty can be the right to self-govern, to be in charge of our own future and rule in such a way to ensure that this happens – that is to insist that our own freedoms matter the most and we may have to suspend the freedom of others to ensure this happens. The alternative view of freedom is rooted in the idea of ‘essential kenosis’, i.e. that true sovereignty is not the domination of the other, but a self-giving, others-empowering love. I would see this latter definition of Sovereignty to be the basis of a more human kind of leadership. Leadership is something which is from among, rather than something which is lorded over others.

I would continue with town and county councils run on this basis, with two nationally elected houses, one based in the north and the other in the south.

Economy

I would start with the breaking up of banks into smaller, regional units, encouraging a multiplicity of options, especially encouraging credit unions and cooperatives. This is a well thought through idea of what to do with RBS, as championed by the New Economics Foundation. This will ensure local lending for local people, businesses and initiatives which will lead to a more sustainable system, more similar to the German or Danish model, both of which have ridden financial storms more easily than those where larger and centralised banks are allowed to dominate the market.

there needs to be a recognition that in all of economic history that we know of, only 3 countries have ever been in surplus and each case this was in a very unusual circumstance and for a short time. The obsession with balancing the books is a nonsense. (A national economy is nothing at all like a household! For instance, we do not have a bank in our back gardens that can print money, nor do we have rich friends living with us, to whom we give special privileges whilst making others work for very little pay, refusing to help them out, but rather telling them they need to have better aspirations and work harder).

A fair society involves creating local environments in which people can work and work pays well, so that a hard days work does not still leave someone unable to afford food, shelter and warmth. A fair society means that when you are unable to work or go through a time of hardship, you will be cared for appropriately. We would encourage the formation and strengthening of unions on this basis.

We need an economy that does not allow organisations to have their headquarters in the UK, but put their profits into other nations, whilst avoiding their fair share of taxation. The UK has many reasons to attract companies here, other than low tax rates and if companies wish to hold the UK to ransom, they can go elsewhere. Instead we will build relationships with those companies that will pay a fair and living wage, ensuring a fair share of profits and contribute to the wellbeing of the economy. Trickle down neoliberalism is failing the vast majority of people, and so we will develop this new economy together.

My Manifesto for the UK post-Brexit (Part 1 – Immigration)

I was having a conversation with someone recently and they challenged me to write a manifesto for the UK, to help put a bit of substance to my various thoughts. What follows is by no means a finished article, nor am I likely to do much with it, but I have found it helpful as an exercise and it serves as a starter on a few issues to spark discussion and also to help me shape my own thoughts further.

I am also a white, privately-educated, “middle-class”, married with 3-kids, “christian” male and so I recognise an inability to communicate, except from the perspective of power and privilege – I can’t change this, but I just want to say that I know it means I can’t see very well.

I hope what I have written is founded on the values of self-giving, others empowering love, the desire to build with positive peace and with hope for a fairer society for everyone. I will start with the area that caused so much debate over the last few weeks and has opened up some deep wounds – let’s see where this goes!

Immigration

I recognise this is a very real and important issue and it is not one that we should be afraid to face up to. My approach would be five-fold:

  1. Our education system will look at the damaging effects of empire and colonisation. We will look at the issue of white and male supremacy and work together to break down these deep set corporate worldviews that we find hard to name let alone own up to. We will help our children and communities face up to the bias and prejudice we all live with and learn from organisations, like the NHS that have done much to tackle them. We will encourage an understanding of the ‘other’ and the benefits of inter-culturalism. We will also work with charities like “together4peace” in Leeds to encourage intercultural dialogue and relationships.
  2. We will introduce a basic rate of pay, guaranteeing a fair and living wage for all of £10 per hour (see economy section for how this is affordable – austerity is NOT the only option available to us!). This will encourage people into work and we will ensure good support of small businesses to make this attainable i.e. the government will give means tested grants to businesses to support them in this. In this way it pays to work, but we will not have a society in which we punish or vilify those who are unable to do so, for whatever reason (see later policy on welfare). It will be illegal for any individual or business to employ workers from overseas or the UK for less than this. This must be legislated and so breaches of this will ensure a heavy fine and/or community service. A second offence would lead to a prison sentence. We cannot endure a culture of westernized slavery that leaves areas impoverished.
  3. We will create local jobs, especially in the places in the UK which have felt forgotten. This will come through a restructuring of the banking sector to encourage local investment in local businesses, as seen in Germany and Denmark. Our banking system is far too centralised and remote. Job creation will come through the creation of locally and/or publicly owned energy, utility and transport services. These might be structured in several different ways and therefore will not take us ‘back to the 1970s’ but create alternative and better ways ahead for local communities.
  4. We will allow the free movement of people but not the free movement of capital. It is not possible to have both. Money created in the UK will stay in the UK ie companies who do their business in the UK will pay their fair share of tax, rather than ship their profits overseas. This will include open but monitored borders, so we are clear who is in the UK, from a security perspective. But overall, we would seek to be a country that welcomes those who want to come here (it’s really not as many as we have been lead to believe!), especially those who need our help at times of crisis in their own nations.
  5. We will encourage every person who lives in the UK to be a net contributor to society where this is possible. We openly recognise and celebrate how many of our public services have depended on the great diversity brought by migrants and refugees from all over the world. We recognise that migrants make a net contribution to our society and give far more in terms of money, skills and rich diversity of culture into the UK than they take. We will ensure welfare for all those who need it, but our international development work will ensure we are able to work with countries to help people where they are to build a future of peace and prosperity (see later post on this). 

 

Obviously all of this needs a great deal of fleshing out, but these would be my overarching principles as points for discussion at this stage – I’m sure it is terribly lacking, so go easy on me – I’m looking for a conversation not a battle!

Theology and Power! (Intro)

I am deliberately intersecting this ‘Reimagining the UK series’ with the ‘My Manifesto for the UK post-Brexit’ series – sorry if it gets confusing!

Ok – first of all a disclaimer – this is my limited perspective on some very complex issues. Although I read quite a bit around all of these subjects, and there are some great books I will recommend as I go along,  I come at this from the angle of a diagnostician. I am also a white, privately-educated, “middle-class”, married with 3-kids, “christian” male and so I recognise an inability to communicate as an oppressed or “disempowered” person – because I am not. I occupy a position of power and strength and I know much less today than I knew when I was 18 (I am now twice that age – and therefore still relatively young and naive).

I have learned some extremely important lessons over the last couple of decades. Here are a few of them: Firstly, it is very important to question things. Secondly, it is also fine to be wrong and to fail – we learn from our mistakes. Thirdly, although I am a very future orientated person, sometimes in order to reimagine other possibilities, we need to have an understanding of our journey and face up to our past. Fourthly, our perspectives can change and letting go of previously held ideals and strongly held views can be a painful and humbling process. Fifthly, it is better to seek to understand than to point the finger and judge someone (often out of fear or arrogance) who holds a different perspective. Sixthly – not all perspectives are right or equally valid, but that does not mean we cannot talk about things we disagree with in a kind manner. My hope is not to create an idealized utopia, but to encourage us on a journey that is more loving, kind and hopeful towards a future of positive peace.

I wrote a blog a couple of posts ago, entitled “Reimagining the United Kingdom”. In it, I expressed a view, that much of where we find ourselves as a nation, particularly in the political climate, has been shaped by centuries of theological, philosophical and ontological perspectives, some of which have become the more dominant narratives of our day. I am so grateful for the academic work and light shone by those who have taken the time to unpack some of this and challenged us to look a bit more deeply at our roots and journeys. This will take a few posts to unpack. I will be particularly looking at this from the angle of the christian/Christendom narrative and so if this doesn’t float your boat, please don’t read on!

 

If you are into delving into some of these issues in a bit more depth, I would recommend the following (in no particular order):

Sacred Economics – Eisenstein

Peace Economics – Galtung

People Over Capital – Rob Harrison (Ed)

Economics of Good and Evil – Sedlacek

Post Capitalism – Mason

Church, Gospel and Empire – Mitchell

State of Exception – Agamben

Theopolitical Imagination – Cavanaugh

The Prophetic Imagination – Brueggemann

Disarming Scripture – Flood

The Immoral Bible – Davies

Parables as Subversive Speech – Herzog

Say to This Mountain – Myers et al.

The Politics of Discipleship – Ward

The Fall of the Church – Mitchell

Discovering Kenarchy – Mitchell & Aram (Ed.)

Falling Upward – Rohr

The Uncontrolling Love of God – Oord

A More Christlike God – Jersak

 

Naming the BEAST: Neoliberalism!

We really must wake up! There is a vile beast at work in our world, which has a name, but we don’t know it and we don’t understand it and so its power grows! It is ravaging the poor and breaking our communities. It wears the mask of freedom, but devours our lives. “The freedom that Neoliberalism offers, which sounds so beguiling when expressed in general terms, turns out to mean freedom for the pike, not for the minnows”. Do you get it? The vast majority of us are the minnows! It serves the predators, not the enslaved. It gives us just enough freedom to think we are free, but we have become captive to the greed and rampant consumerist individualism it instills. We must throw off the chains. We have to shake off our malaise. It is the very antithesis, or the exact opposite, of what Jesus called the kingdom of God. It is, in fact, the dominant political and economic philosophy of our day. All the major political parties drink deeply from its cup. The Labour party do not think they can win an election without it and its poison will destroy the NHS, education system and all other public services.   We need to know about it, understand it, be delivered of its power and reimagine some altogether different, creative and positive alternative ways of approaching life together, that will free us from its grip.

 

Please make yourself a good old cup of fair-trade or slave-free tea and take some time to read this in depth article from the very clever George Monbiot. As he writes: “it’s not enough to oppose a broken system. A coherent alternative has to be proposed.”

 

George Monbiot https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/apr/15/neoliberalism-ideology-problem-george-monbiot

 

 

Reimagining the United Kingdom

imgresIt is no secret that I voted to remain in the EU. All 3 generations of my family, who were eligible to vote, also voted to remain (and my kids would have voted the same way, had they had the chance – under no parental pressure, you understand!). And yet, as my long departed Nanna would say (the one, who knew all the names of her grandchildren after her stroke, except mine, and called me, Edith!)…. “Well, here we are….”

 

Here we are indeed. I am disappointed and sad, but here we are. We have some deeply painful and complicated times ahead of us, but for those of us who voted to remain, what we must not do is retreat into a finger pointing woundedness that is willing to embrace the ‘other’ in Europe, but the reject the ‘other’ in the UK, who felt that Brexit was the way to go. No. In a world where we long for a positive approach to peace, for reconciliation under-girded by our first value to love one another, we must hold ourselves to account and dig deep to remember who we are and what kind of future we want to build together.

 

There are some really really important conversations for us to have right across the UK that will help us to face up to and heal the wounds we have exposed. Both sides of the debate over the EU have some significant hurts and many of them go deeper than a simple in/out referendum could ever address.

 

So, how do we engage together and have conversations with people from different sides of the dividing line about what kind of UK we might see develop? What might we reimagine together? Is there a hope of a Union left? Here are some things that I would like to explore in some upcoming blogs and see what conversations emerge:

 

imagesOntology – what?! Yep – in the end, so much of who we are and how we live, what we align ourselves with and how we would choose to shape our future together depends on this. Basically – why are we here? What is our purpose? We need to understand this at an individual and a corporate level. As I have suggested in my other blog (www.reimagininghealth.com) our health and wellbeing actually depends on having a life that aligns with this sense of knowing why we are.

 

Theology and Philosophy – what?! Yes – again, so much of our life in this nation and imgrescertainly our politics is under-girded by things people have/have not believed about God and his/her interaction with the world. Whether you are a person of faith or not, it is difficult to deny that for good or ill, the geopolitical worldview of the West has been hugely shaped by the partnership of church and empire over the preceding several centuries. This area of thought and study especially shapes our understanding of ‘Sovereignty’.

 

Economics – this is more obvious. How we choose to “order our house” has huge imgresimplications of how we then live in the world. David Cameron tells us there is ‘no alternative’ to the Neoliberal economic agenda with its reliance on the ‘benevolent’ free market, competition, privatisation, biopower and austerity. And whether the UK or the EU is the worst proponent of this, I’m not sure, but perhaps other options are available to us. Maybe we don’t need to have an ever widening gap between the rich and poor. Maybe we don’t have to have a London-Centric (or even with the emergence of a Northern Powerhouse, a Liverpool-Manchester-Leeds-Centric) economy. Does our economy always have to grow? If it does – what does this mean for the creation of a peaceful world or our ecosystems? Isn’t it high time we had a good hard look at what our policies are doing to the world we live in, or demand in terms of war and self-protectionism? I recently trained as an executive coach – I can tell you for sure, there are always options…..it is a lie to say that we have no alternative. We do. We can have a fairer society and perhaps it’s time for us to say to the corporate giants who threaten us that they will up and leave if we don’t give them enormous tax breaks and turn a blind eye to their greed, that we will find a kinder way of being without them. There are options open to us of renationalisation of some things, co-operatives, credit unions, gift economies, time banking and many other things explored by top economists, which the press give no voice to.

 

And then we have more surface issues. What about our relationship with Europe and the rest of the world now? Surely we aren’t going to believe we have some kind of Empire-like influence in the world anymore? The British Empire and Christendom are both over! So, now that we don’t have them and we’re not part of the EU – what kind of partnerships do we want with other nations?

 

imagesAnd what about education? Is it OK that there was such a massive split in how people voted according to what they had achieved at an academic level? Are we developing academic snobbery? Are we developing education systems where there is an understanding of important issues like the one we’ve just had a referendum about? If it wasn’t for our dinner time conversations, my kids would know nothing about the EU – but thanks to Michael Gove, they can tell me about subordinate clauses and modal verbs! There is something very wrong with that.

 

5517007247_63d55ac8f5_m[1]For healthcare – we already know that the Brexit campaign told us a complete lie about how much extra funding would be available to the NHS. But here we are! Given our current economic policies, it is difficult to see how our Nation’s favourite brand will survive. You cannot believe in an ever shrinking state and increased privatisation and continue to have the best and fairest healthcare system in the world! This is why we need greater participatory leadership and truer representative democracy!

 

Ecology, peace-making and so much more need to be the discussions around our kitchen tables, on our walks and in our cafes and pubs. Enough of the hypnosis by our media! Let’s find each other again, heal our hurts, listen, seek to understand and together find solutions for how we are going to live in this world. Here is to a future of love, hope and peace. I will explore some more of this in the coming blogs.

Understanding Neoliberal Economics

I am a big fan of the New Economics Foundation.
Here is a really helpful 6 part introduction to neoliberalism, how it has come to dominate the world economy and what some alternatives might be. Well worth a listen!
Beginner’s Guide to Neoliberalism by New Economics Foundation

https://itun.es/gb/Absg-.c