Naming the BEAST: Neoliberalism!

We really must wake up! There is a vile beast at work in our world, which has a name, but we don’t know it and we don’t understand it and so its power grows! It is ravaging the poor and breaking our communities. It wears the mask of freedom, but devours our lives. “The freedom that Neoliberalism offers, which sounds so beguiling when expressed in general terms, turns out to mean freedom for the pike, not for the minnows”. Do you get it? The vast majority of us are the minnows! It serves the predators, not the enslaved. It gives us just enough freedom to think we are free, but we have become captive to the greed and rampant consumerist individualism it instills. We must throw off the chains. We have to shake off our malaise. It is the very antithesis, or the exact opposite, of what Jesus called the kingdom of God. It is, in fact, the dominant political and economic philosophy of our day. All the major political parties drink deeply from its cup. The Labour party do not think they can win an election without it and its poison will destroy the NHS, education system and all other public services.   We need to know about it, understand it, be delivered of its power and reimagine some altogether different, creative and positive alternative ways of approaching life together, that will free us from its grip.

 

Please make yourself a good old cup of fair-trade or slave-free tea and take some time to read this in depth article from the very clever George Monbiot. As he writes: “it’s not enough to oppose a broken system. A coherent alternative has to be proposed.”

 

George Monbiot https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/apr/15/neoliberalism-ideology-problem-george-monbiot

 

 

Democracy is not enough

I had the privilege of being part of a Love Politics Initiative the other weekend. A group of co-conspirators gets together two or three times a year to activate one another in reimagining a different kind of politics. 

One of the people present was a man called Mark Rotherham, who is the closest thing I’ve ever encountered to St Francis of Assisi! At one point in the weekend, he led us in an extraordinary meditation about the inert gas, Argon and I hope that he will do it as a podcast for this blog at some point soon. 
One of the things Mark said during the weekend had a profound effect on me and I have been mulling it over ever since. What he stated was this: “Democracy is not enough. What we need is biocracy.”
We are so intimately connected to every living thing and although we are facing the biggest ecological catastrophe we have ever known as a species on a global level, we are heading straight for it as though we are watching it in slow motion. And yet because we do not think of the ecosystems we live in as having a voice, we do not listen to them or give them a voice at our “democratic” tables. We absolutely have to stop, look and listen. We have to hear the silenced cry of the whales washed up on our European shores, with their bellies full of our plastic waste. We have to listen to the sea birds smothered to death in oil slicks. We have to listen to the melting glaciers and the fallen trees. We must listen to the dance of the bees facing extinction.
We must speak up for those who do not have a voice for themselves. We share this planet together. Human voices are not adequately speaking for those we share this planet with. Human ears are certainly not hearing the earth speaking to us. Democracy has failed the planet. Biocracy may be a saving grace.

Reimagining Politics

We so desperately need to reimagine politics. We need a new politics. We need a politics based and founded on love, respect, hope and peace. The utterly appalling behaviour in the house of commons this week demonstrates just how out of touch this system is with every day life.

If I had been Jeremy Corbyn on Monday at the dispatch box, I would have waited for the jeering to die down, and I would have said the following:

“Mr Speaker, what has just occurred in this house is nothing short of a disgrace. I don’t mind a joke or a bit of banter but I draw a line here today. In this house, we call each other “honourable friends”. The heckling that just occurred was dishonourable, it was rude, it was unkind, it was disrespectful, it was unfriendly and it was unnecessary. It is demonstrative of the reason why so many people are disengaged with our current political system. To stand here and be jeered at, by esteemed colleagues, including the Home Secretary herself is at best unacceptable. It is a pox on this house.

Here we are, trusted, elected members of this house, given the honour of debating matters of utmost importance to this nation, and we reduce it to this. I hope, Mr Speaker, that I will have an apology on my desk from my honourable friend in the morning. He asked me who I am. I ask him, who he is to treat me in that way? I hope, Mr Speaker, that we might find a better way of having these debates and I hope that the Prime Minister might get his own house in order, so that we continue in this very important discussion about our future relationship with Europe. Today, I am ashamed of this house. I have no more questions.”

And then, I would have walked out.

This has to stop. A line must be drawn in the sand. A new politics is needed.

Where is the Love?

Here is a song I have written. It asks some questions about why on earth we are living in some of the ways we are – many people are calling for a new politics – a politics based on love and kindness – this song is part of my contribution to this hope:

Another world, a better world, a more beautiful, caring, compassionate, equitable is possible.

Political Parables – Education as a Revolution

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Paulo Freire

Paulo Freire was an educational revolutionary who saw that the poor, marginalised and oppressed in Brasil, took on the world view (or “social construct of reality”) of those who were their oppressors. More than this he described how the educational system was used like a “banking system” to deposit the world view of the dominant class, (with their wealth, power and privilege), into the hearts and minds of the lower social classes, therefore maintaining the status quo.

He spent loads of time with the “peasant classes”, (after a financial crisis in his own family left them very poor) and learnt that they were certainly not unintelligent and although illiterate, had an incredible language of their own. He went on to devise an educational program which enabled these “peasants” to learn rather than to be taught and in so doing released them to begin a revolution in which the powers were challenged, the presumed ‘ways of being’ were shaken and new freedom was found. Unfortunately, this was crushed by the military coup of 1964, but it left Freire never again to “underestimate the vested interest of political powers in controlling the production and distribution of knowledge through their system of schooling” (see amazing work on his by William R. Herzog II in Parables as Subversive Speech).

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William R. Herzog II

Herzog goes on to draw some extraordinary parallels between Paulo Freire and Jesus Christ, whom he asserts both hugely confront the power paradigms of the day and in so doing bring good news to the poor, freedom for those held captive to oppressive systems, sight for those who had been blinded by the worldview of the ‘mighty’ and light for those living in darkness.

Walter Brueggemann

Walter Brueggemann

Mitchell, in his book, “Church, Gospel and Empire’ demonstrates how Jesus directly challenges the Imperial System of Rome. Brueggemann (in “The Prophetic Imagination”) contends that Jesus (as a prophet and much more than just a prophet) is fulfilling the prophetic tradition of those who have gone before, criticising the oppressive systems and energising a fresh imagination of how radically different a future built on the foundations of (God’s) love could be.

I wonder how many teachers these days see it as their role to teach and train their pupils in the ‘national curriculum’ and the ‘social constructs of reality’ to which we all subscribe? And how many see their role as revolutionaries who dare to allow our children to believe that the world we live in can be radically different in the future; where instead of an economics of affluence, we have an economics of equity, instead of a politics of oppression, we have one of justice and compassion, and instead of a religion of immanence and law, we have one of true freedom (again, see Brueggemann) – I don’t know, but if you’re out there – please keep going!

Political Parables – A Mini Series

UnknownI love reading. For lent this year, my wife and I have switched off the TV and are giving our noses some more book time. There are two books I’ve read this past 12 months which have impacted me deeply: “Parables as Subversive Speech – Jesus as Pedagogue of the Oppressed” by William R. Herzog II and “The Prophetic Imagination” by  Walter Brueggemann. I would seriously recommend them to you, whatever your faith or political background – they are challenging to the core. I want to blog a mini series on lUnknown-1essons I have learnt and thoughts that have provoked me as I have read.

One of the people whom I hugely admire is Mehdi Hassan. I admire his courage to speak his mind, to be unashamed about what he believes as a Muslim and his passion in debate. I have felt challenged by the way he puts his faith front and centre whilst engaging deeply in the political issues of our day. I make no secret of the fact that I am a man who loves and follows Jesus (not very good at it, but hey-ho!). The more I have discovered about Jesus, especially over the last few years, the more I have found I love him. My world view is shaped by his radical love for ‘the other’ and for ‘the enemy’, his prioritisation of women, children, the poor, the sick, the prisoner and those generally hated or ostracised by society. There is no-one in history who has ever brought such a sharp critique of Imperial Systems that commodify human life like fodder to feed an economic machine or challenged the status quo mindsets to the extent that he did. Nor did anyone else release such deep hope of a reimagined future.

And yet, those of us who claim to follow him have so often utterly missed his point and have been more caught up in creating a religion around him that he never intended anyone to build, partnering with empire in the process rather than criticising it and bringing transforming love and economic justice to all of the creation.

I hope this mini-series inspires some good conversation, either online or around some dinner tables about the world we live in and how we engage with it. For me, the parables of Jesus have as much dynamic power to shock us today as they did for his first listeners. Put aside any hang ups about ‘christianity’ or ‘politics’ and let the subversive stories make you think.

 

The Ring of Power

I’m currently reading Tolkien’s ‘The Lord of the Rings to my eldest son. We have just finished that part in ‘The Two Towers’ in which Gandalf has returned to Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli at the turning of the tide. He makes this awesome statement about Sauron the dark lord:

‘That we should wish to cast him down and have NOONE in his place is not a thought that occurs to his mind. That we should try to destroy the ring (of power) itself has not entered into his darkest dream.’

There are still the stirrings of revolution in many nations. But revolution that is based on violence and only replaces one form of dominant power with another sort of hierarchical dominance is no revolution at all.

Kenarchy is about the emptying out of power. It comes from an understanding that the politics of Jesus were about emptying out power and utterly transforming it. Leadership is not only to be kenotic (that is poured out for others), it is to be kenarchic (that is emptied out) so that we begin to understand that the lowest place is the highest place. We begin to understand that level playing fields are the order of the day. We are not looking for new political parties, but a new politics, that is a new way of relating to one another. We are not looking for new economic regulations, but a new economics. We are not searching for peace maintained through violence but a genuine love of one another, including the love of our ‘enemies’ that transforms how we live together as humanity.

William T Cavanaugh gives a radical reinterpretation of the christian eucharist in the light of this. We live in a divided world in which the ‘powers’ crush and break the multitude. When Jesus breaks bread and gives it away, he is not looking to form an exclusive club. He is, rather inviting us to partake of this kind of givenness, to embrace brokenness in the face of violence and to find that this way of life-poured-out-love finds hope in resurrection. As we eat the bread, we receive life, we become life and we give life as we share with others. The bread is given and is available to all who will receive it. Our barriers are broken down, our borders and our flags lose their relevance. We become part of this trans-local body that only exists to bring life, love and peace. There is no politics (way of doing life) that is more radical than this.

The nation state project holds power at the centre. It uses the components of money, law and control through violence to do this. I believe that as we build relationally in our localities we can find new ways of being. This is happening on a vast scale already and many stories are emerging of alternative ways of being that provide a different narrative to the dominant (economic and political) one of our day.