Northern Powerhouse or an Empowered North?

There has recently been an excellent set of programmes on radio 4 about the North and what it means to be Northern. Some parts were hilarious and others deeply moving. Although we don’t want a North-South divide, neither do we want a homogenisation that sees a loss of identity. A Northern Powerhouse, (whoever it is lead by – George Osborne, Andy Burnham or Michael Bloomberg) is the last thing the North wants or needs. We don’t want the London model of trickle down economics. Who wants to end up with a trickle? There’s nothing worse than standing under a shower that doesn’t work properly! We don’t want the social cleansing of our cities and swathes of people feeling marginalised and forgotten. No. That is not the northern way. The North has a great history of social cohesion, people movements, social change and political debate. The promise of greater power that only serves to maintain a wounded and broken economic system, widening the gap between the rich and poor is not welcome here. We do not want to build a powerhouse. The land here remembers all too well the sweat, blood and tears of the powerhouses of the industrial revolution. If the government is serious about releasing more power northwards, then the power must be given to be worked with in a generative way, motivated by love, to create a fairer society for everyone. ┬áLife is already too fast paced, using human beings as commodities or fuel for the fire. No, we need to rediscover our humanity, to re-humanise our systems. We don’t want a pre-thought through model. We want to shape it ourselves and create the kind of society that aligns itself with our values. We are not robots or industrial machines. It is time for the fire of the North to ignite some conversations about what kind of future we might co-create rather than have something imposed on us, if it’s all the same to you, London!

Cities in the Future

Some simple statements and observations to spark discussion:

The nations state project is cracking and waning. Nation states as they are have become unsustainable and unmanageable and the imagination needed to hold them together is beginning to falter. They are too complex, un-relational and imperial in their make up.

I believe the shift towards a federation of city states with regional, interconnected, interdependent, intercultural and relational ways of operating is something we are going to move towards in the next 30-50 years.

So, now is the time for cities to start having key conversations across the whole spectrum of society and begin a process of reimagination. It is vital that the marginalised are given a voice and not just ‘represented’ at this table of discussion so that the cities of the future become a place where neighbourhoods of desolation are fully restored. It is time for the artists to to help us to visualise some fresh alternatives and for experiments in economics and kenarchy to be given some fresh space to discover new ways of being.